HISTORY OF BOHEMIA BAGEL

Many expats have known Bohemia Bagel name and food for years. Long story short - Bohemia Bagel had started to sell American bagels to Czech people in the 90s, when Glenn Spicker had stopped in Prague to briefly check it on his way to Russia... and loved the city so much that he has stayed here since. And it´s been almost thirty years now!

Glenn Spicker came to Prague in 1991. He was studying in Germany and when East Europe started changing, he wanted to taste it himself. Because this is how he is. He can´t sit still for two minutes, he wants to explore everything, he is so curious. And lots of people may think he has almost no self-preservation. So in 1992, Glenn used all the money he inherited from his late American granddad and opened a couple of bars in Prague. Back in States, there was a bagel fever starting and Glenn wanted to bring bagels to Prague. To the city that has never ever even seen a bagel. And that´s when the Bohemia Bagel was born.

Throughout the years, Bohemia Bagel has changed of course. We have opened new locations. We have been one of the first to sell hamburgers, we have been one of the first to serve brunches, we have changed our menu gradually. And the market has developed too so we converted our old locations. We´ve opened new restaurants instead of fast food bars.

But now, we are back with THE bagel. You have missed it, and we know it. Lately, Glenn Spicker together with his brother from another mother Scott Kelly found their lost sibling Isaac Starobin.
So, hold your hats.
Bohemia Bagel is back.

BAGEL DIDN'T JUST EMERGE FROM NOWHERE

A bagel, also historically spelled beigel, is a bread product originating in the Jewish communities of Poland. It is traditionally shaped by hand into the form of a ring from yeasted wheat dough, roughly hand-sized, that is first boiled for a short time in water and then baked. The result is a dense, chewy, doughy interior with a browned and sometimes crisp exterior. Bagels are often topped with seeds baked on the outer crust, with the traditional ones being poppy and sesame seeds. Some may have salt sprinkled on their surface, and there are different dough types, such as whole-grain and rye.

Bagels are eaten toasted or untoasted.
Bagels are now a popular bread product in North America and Poland, especially in cities with a large Jewish population, many with alternative ways of making them. Like other bakery products, bagels are available (fresh or frozen, often in many flavors) in many major supermarkets in those cities.
The basic roll-with-a-hole design is hundreds of years old and has other practical advantages besides providing more even cooking and baking of the dough: The hole could be used to thread string or dowels through groups of bagels, allowing easier handling and transportation and more appealing seller displays.

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